DOUG'S 'HEAVY METAL' GALLERY

 

T A N K SC A R R I E R SG U N SA R M O U R E D   C A R S

 

Dingo Scout Car replica.
   (Ver 1)



10630

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Here are some photos of the replica under construction. Not exactly professional photography here!

The first phase of construction took place at a my friend Dave Gordon's house. Dave has an excellent early slat grill British airborne jeep and a Mk I British airborne jeep trailer. http://www.io.com/~tog/

Later we moved the replica to building No. 19 at Camp Mabry. Building 19 is where the Texas Armed Forces Museum used to do restorations. The museum also stored it's saluting guns there, a pair of 75mm pack howitzers. When the national guard decided to demolish the building we moved the replica to my house. Building 19 was built during WW1 and was then a horse stable. The building was haunted.

When I started this thing it was a group project. The group wanted to get going fast so I made working drawings from a scale model and a few photos. The overall dimensions are very close, but most of the others were little better than guesswork. If something is wrong, it is a bit late to do much about it. I never found scale drawings to check my work, but I believe I made an already small crew compartment even smaller. I have since obtained a CAD drafting program and my friend Dave took some good photos of a scout car while visiting England. I wish I had had both when we started this project. This particular scout car was painted silver on the inside like early British tanks. Worked good for photos!

The front armor is hollow. It consists of two layers of 3.2mm steel with 19mm square tube between.

10654

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10655

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10656

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The front visors are hollow, the gun doors are solid 1" thick mild steel. The driver's visor will be replaced since I now know what the inside looks like and I cannot alter a hollow visor to look correct. The replacement will have to be solid.
The sloping front plate is actually 3.2mm with a dummy weld to give the impression that it's 1" thick.


10657

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  The bonnet is 3.2mm thick, the other body panels are all made from 4.75mm mild steel it is held in place with four cam locks, I have not figured out how I will make these yet.
The front and side stowage bin lids were made by a sheetmetal shop. Everything else was hand shaped.

10658

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10631

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  The frame and engine compartment sides and rear panel are of 16 gauge (1.6mm) sheetmetal over a tubular steel skeleton. The engine cooling louvers are made from 3/16 x 2" (4.75x 51mm) angle iron.

10633

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10634

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10635

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  The gunner's seat will be constructed from two 1960's automobile bumper jacks with 2" (51mm) pipe sleeves for height adjustment, a boomerang shaped piece of 1/2" (12.7mm) plate for the pivoting base and 1/2" (20mm O.D.) gas pipe for the seat frame. The roof support bar was made from 3/4" gas pipe, it's outside diameter is about 26mm. I have made mud flaps from khaki webbing with steel weights sewn into the bottom edge. I have collected most of the kit for a wireless scout car and it's crew. I have not found "bleach powder" and anti-gas capes. My No. 19 set lacks aerials, guards, most of the leads and the control box. The aerial bases seen in the photos are mock-ups and are on the wrong side.

10637

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  The two gallon petrol tins are: 2- C/|\ '42, 1- US made 1940 and one Brit from 1941. Each has a different cap: Shell, Shell-Mex, Esso and plain. The '40 dated can has a metal disc riveted to the underside of the handle. This disc is a bit wider than the handle. I suspect this was for night time identification? My tyres and wheels are from a M151, they are 7.00x16, the tyres are 29.5" (75 cm) in diameter. I believe they are about 2" (52mm) too small. The wheels measure 17.5" (44.5 cm). My guess is they're about 3" too small. I can find nothing this side of the pond that's a better match.

10632

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  I have the gunner's seat all figured out, but I do not know how the driver's seat is mounted or adjusted. I have no good photos of the area beneath the radio shelf, (shelf supports and battery mounting). I have seen what looks like a two tiered magazine rack for the gunner to scrape his knees on. I purchased a photocopy of a scout car service manual. It has lots of good information on parts I don't have. It refers to the tail lamp, but has no good picture of it. I have a red glass lens from a WW II US vehicle, it is about 1-1/2" (37mm) in diameter. I am hoping that this lens mounted in a suitably sized grommet will look correct. I believe the side lights I bought from a fellow in England are the correct style. I haven't tried to find bulbs yet. I have a second WW II US made blackout lamp that will have a regular sealed beam lamp for night driving around the battlefield.

10638

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10639

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  The rear visor is missing the center hinge because I temporarily lost it. These were made from scratch. There are no screw heads visible around this visor as I have not made the operating lever or latch yet.

10636

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  I have most of an operational WS #19 set. I need a list of parts for a scout car installation kit. I believe I need a control unit No. 3 or No. 3A, but I am not sure about anything. I have seen photos of many different field modifications on scout cars. One photo I found showed two petrol cans located where the tool box and adjacent stowage bin were supposed to be. I chose to put only one here, so I could keep the stowage bin. This petrol can is actually my fuel tank. The fuel tank will be a dummy. I plan to use it to hide the bottles and regulator for a gas operated Bren gun. P.S. The vehicle markings on the rear are incorrect magnetic ones a friend had. I plan to change some of the painted ones, especially those giant aiming marks on each side!

My thanks to Fred.

 

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