DOUG'S 'HEAVY METAL' GALLERY

 

T A N K SC A R R I E R SG U N SA R M O U R E D   C A R S

 

Slapton Sands DD Sherman.
   (Ver 1)

 

A live fire practise was held in the south of England for the D-Day landings. The whole thing turned into a disaster of epic proportions mainly, but not soley due to, the coincidental arrival of German E-Boats (Schnell Boots). Campbell visited the memorial Sherman whilst in England on his Beltring trip in 2002. As you will see in the pics, it was typically England and raining at the time.

The DD tanks (Duplex Drive) basically were regular tanks equipped with a collapsible canvas flotation screen. The screen surrounded the tank and made a water tight seal with about 1' sticking above the water line. The top of the turret was roughly at water line height - not an inspiring idea for the driver, who could see nothing other than canvas! The screen was held up by a compressed air supply. The tank was propelled through the water by 2 propellers at the rear which were mechanically connected to the tracks. Quite a good idea, as the tracks also assisted the propellers. It had the advantage of not having to muck about with disengaging water drive and re-engaging land drive etc as with many other amphibious vehicles. But, as tanks were never meant to float, the whole concept at best was one of necessity rather than safety. The loss rate was high, both in training and in combat.

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Campbell.


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Close up of the DD drive (incomplete). This provided the mechanical linkage that turned the propeller, one each side.


My thanks to Campbell.

 

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